Seeking Help Via Casey's Law - The Healing Place Seeking Help Via Casey's Law - The Healing Place

Seeking Help Via Casey’s Law

Looking to get your loved one help for substance abuse? Did you know that in Kentucky, there is a law in place that will allow you to petition the courts to get someone involuntarily into treatment?

It’s called Casey’s Law. Casey’s Law is named after Matthew Casey Wethington, who died of a heroin overdose in 2003 at the age of 23. After his death, Casey’s parents lobbied for Casey’s Law so that parents, family members, or friends could petition the court for treatment on behalf of the individuals who are suffering from addiction. Casey’s Law went into effect in Kentucky in 2004 with Ohio following suit in 2012.

The Healing Place is open to those who are being ordered to treatment via Casey’s Law. When someone is ordered to The Healing Place, we will screen them to see if they are appropriate for our program. Just because someone has been ordered to be here doesn’t necessarily mean we are the best place for them. We assess the client and if they are appropriate for our program, we notify the court that they have been accepted. If the client leaves The Healing Place, we notify the court about that as well.

Clients who come to The Healing Place via Casey’s Law must sign a release of information so that we can communicate with the courts. If someone isn’t a good fit for our recovery program, we make a referral to the court that is more appropriate for the individual.

Beds at The Healing Place are available on a first come first served basis and that does not change regarding Casey’s Law clients. We can’t prioritize Casey’s Law clients because that means we are not prioritizing the person who comes in off the street seeking help voluntarily.

For more information on the Casey’s Law process and how to get started, click here.